Wenatchee

view of Wenatchee

Wenatchee is a mid-size metropolitan area located within the North Cascades region of Washington State. The greater area also incorporates East Wenatchee.

Understand

George Sellars Bridge

Wenatchee is located at the confluence of the Wenatchee and Columbia Rivers and is within the rain shadow of the Cascade Range, which means that unlike cities in western Washington, Wenatchee sees nearly 300 days of sunshine per year. It’s climate is very similar to that of other eastern Washington cities, yet it still retains the picturesque views of the Cascade mountains.

It is believe by archeologists that an ancient people had migrated to the Wenatchee area during the last ice, some 12,000 years ago. This belief is based on many Clovis artifacts that have been found in or around the greater Wenatchee. These ancient people are thought to be the descendants of whom would later become known as the Yakima Indians. White settlers began to move into the area during the late 1800s and early 1900s and colonization began.

The Wenatchee Valley provides an ideal climate for agricultural, and therefore, the area has become widely known for its produce. There are a plethora of orchards in the valley, especially Apple orchards, from which Wenatchee has earned the slogan “Apple Capital of the World.”

In recent years, the city has seen substantial growth within its communities. The greater Wenatchee area incorporates East Wenatchee, which lies on the opposite side of the Columbia River, as well as Rock Island and Malaga. The greater area has a population estimated at over 100,000 residents. It is a popular destination for outdoor adventurers and enthusiasts looking to find a refreshing getaway from their every day surroundings.

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By plane

By bus

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See

Do

Sleep

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Go next

Routes through Wenatchee

Seattle Leavenworth  W  E  Ephrata Spokane
Everett Cashmere  W  E  Waterville Spokane
Oroville Chelan  N  S  Cashmere Yakima


This article is issued from Wikivoyage - version of the Thursday, December 24, 2015. The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share Alike but additional terms may apply for the media files.