Split

The Belltower in central Split

Split is a city in Central Dalmatia, Croatia, and the seat of the Split-Dalmatia county. The city was originally built around the Diocletian palace (a palace/fort built for the retired Roman emperor Diocletian) where the locals sought refuge centuries ago. Wandering the historic centre of Split you can still clearly see the Roman walls, squares, and temples.

Understand

Because of its ideal climate, with 2,800 hours of sunlight each year, local people have a few nicknames for Split: "The most beautiful city in the world" and "Mediterranean flower". Many famous Croatian sports people were born in Split, so locals often nicknamed their city "The sportiest city in the world". The most popular sport institution is the football club Hajduk. Large portions of the city are painted with the club's colors and logo. This is done by Torcida, the oldest supporters group in Europe, established in 1950. Besides the bell tower of St. Duje, the symbols of city are the Dalmatian dog and a donkey. Locals have a high regard for the donkey because of its past indispensable place in field work and transport across the Dalmatian mountains.

Winters in Split are generally mild, with temperatures above 0°C, but despite the popular saying that the city experiences snowfall once every 30 years, there is actually at least one snowy day nearly every winter, usually in January or early February. If you find yourself in Split on a day with significant snowfall, expect serious traffic disruption.

Get in

By plane

Split Airport (IATA: SPU) is, after Zagreb Airport, the most important in Croatia. Scheduled services fly to major European cities, with summer charter flights from more. The airport is about 25 km west from Split, near the city of Trogir. It has free WiFi internet. Airport buses run from the terminal to the city and stop at the eastern end of 'Riva'. A single ticket costs 30 kn. Local buses run from the road outside the terminal -- walk through the parking lot and go to the bus stop on the other side of the road.

Bus number 37 runs about every 30 min and costs 16 kn (tickets are bought from the bus driver). Bus 37 does not take you all the way to the historical centre and you need to switch to bus 9 or 10, or just walk about a kilometre along the major road that runs by the bus stop (stops for buses 9 and 10 are also by this road). In addition, a small fraction of the departures from Split main bus station to Trogir on work days use the road next to the airport. In the on-line timetables search for ZRAČNA L.-AIRPORT (but take into account that the timetable is not necessarily 100% correct). Going to the airport, onboard the bus tell the conductor that you want a stop at the airport.

A shuttle bus run by Pleso Transport Company operates between the airport and the city centre. If you ask locals for directions they will automatically point you towards this bus, but beware if you are travelling with another airline then this bus schedule is a bit irrelevant. A single ticket costs 30 kn (about €4). As of April 2010, it appears as if the shuttle bus meets all scheduled arriving flights even those not from Croatia Airlines. When exiting the terminal go to your right and you should see the buses.

Taxis will also take you into town. A taxi to Split centre (ferry port or Diocletian's Palace) takes a bit over 30 min and costs about 270 kn on the meter, though most drivers will agree on 220 if asked in advance. If your transferring to a ferry tell the driver the ferry departure time so he can rush if necessary.

If leaving Split by plane, be careful to plan the journey to the airport in advance, as local buses don't run before 5AM or after midnight.

Flights to and from Belgrade, Serbia were reintroduced in June 2012 after a 21-year hiatus. As of July there are four flights per week. As expected, there is massive demand for these planes, so book with Croatia Airlines or Jat Airways well in advance in order to get a cheaper ticket. If you are seated next to the window, you can catch a magnificent glimpse of Sarajevo from 21,000 feet.

By bus

Frequent buses run to and from Zagreb, Dubrovnik, Sibenik, Zadar, Rijeka etc. There are also regular buses to and from Mostar and Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina) (210 kn), Belgrade (Serbia), Trieste (Italy) and major cities of Germany and Austria. You can get detailed information on AK Split about departure and arrival times.

In the summer season there are more lines than off-season, for example in June–July-August, daily night buses to Banja Luka and Gradiska, north of Bosnia, as well as buses to Niš, Serbia twice a week.

On most intercity buses you pay a fee for luggage. This fee of about €0.5-€1 per piece of luggage is paid to the driver upon boarding. Some drivers are rather picky about being paid in exact change in the correct currency (sometimes a local currency, at other instances requesting to be paid in Euros) and sometimes also refuse to be paid in too small coins. So keep some change ready.

Local buses run to and from Trogir and Solin.

Eurobusways has direct buses between Split and Budapest Budapest Split bus

By boat

Ferries run three times a week across the Adriatic to and from Ancona and Pescara (Italy). There is also a large ferry that runs twice a week up and down the coast between Dubrovnik and Rijeka, stopping off at a couple of islands along the way.

Split is the main hub for local boats and hydrofoils in Central Dalmatia. Several a day run to and from Brac, Hvar, Solta, Vis, Korčula and Lastovo.

By train

Split train station is right in the city centre, it is a few minutes walk from the port and from the old town. Expect very friendly grannies to be waiting with signs saying "Sobe" (rooms) at all arrivals and they will jump on anyone with a backpack. The train station is rather basic, because train travel is not much used to Split.

Trains run between Split and Zagreb, Split and Perković (where you can change for Šibenik). Timetables can be found from Croatian Railways website . Trains are generally slower than buses in Croatia, the price is approximately similar.

Trains to Perković through the picturesque valley/village of Primorski Dolac depart 5 times a day and stop in every station taking 1 hr exactly to do the journey. This is a very picturesque journey to make, and although Perković is simply a collection of houses you could get off and have a coffee or go for a walk in the hills before returning to Split. Connecting Trains leave Perković for Šibenik several times a day, and should be marked on the timetable in Split station.

Waiting by the sea

Get around

harbour, bus terminal, and train station

Central Split is quite compact and most sights can be easily seen and best experienced on foot, but there are frequent local buses to outlying attractions and the airport.

By bus

Public transit is organized by Promet. Most of the city buses in Split are new, but some are very old and dilapidated. Tickets can be bought at kiosks or from the bus driver. Only single-journey tickets can be bought in buses.

When you board the bus you must validate your ticket in the yellow machine or give it to the driver for validation.

By bike

Rent a bike and enjoy beautiful biking along Split's waterfront (Riva), continue to Marjan hill (approximately 7 km), climb to the top of the hill for great view on the Split town and surrounding islands. You can bike to the east side, along the coast to nearby village of Stobrec. Another great option from Split is to take a day tour to nearby islands of Solta, Brac, Hvar or Vis. You can take the bike on a regular ferry (they leave approximately every couple of hours in the summer season) and bike along quite roads and charming villages, explore great beaches and restaurants and return in the evening to Split!

Older but rideable mountain bikes are available for 15 kn/hour (March 2012) at the northern entrance to Marjan hill (near Mandalinski put).

By boat

Speed taxi boat is an excellent solution for fast transportation of passengers on whole Adriatic. Said service is available trough Dalmatia-express for direct transportation from airport Split to Split Riva or from Split Riva to Dalmatia islands.

If you don't know how to sail, there are a few companies that offer skippered charters in the area. If you are seeking something affordable, Antlos enables you to book boat holidays with local Skippers that offer trips around Split's coastline and visits to the neighbouring islands and if you're looking for something upmarket, there are many superyacht charter agencies such as Burgess Yachts and Camper and Nicholsons.

See

Basement of Diocletian's Palace
Museum

Do

Riva

Sailing

There are lots of companies running boats, such as Busabout, Topdeck and Contiki.

The majority of sailing charters start from the city of Split. There are many charter agencies where you can charter a sailing or motor yacht which are based in Split. Most of them operate from ACI marina Split, marina Zenta or marina Spinut. There are also many charter agencies based in marina Kastela which is based in the vicinity of Split.

When you charter a yacht through a charter agency and arrive to the designated marina there are a few things that need to be done.

The most important thing is the yacht check in (usually Saturday around 4PM). Take your time doing yacht check in. Familiarise yourself with the chartered yacht and with the yacht equipment. The rule of thumb is the more time you take for the yacht check in, the less time you will need for the yacht check out.

After that you have to do the shopping for the charter vacation. Don't neglect the groceries shopping because the sea is unpredictable and you don't want to get stuck on the boat without sufficient provisions of food and drink.

You can do the shopping in a marina although the prices are usually much higher there, or you can order from yacht provisioning services who usually deliver the products to the marina at no extra fee. In Jam Yacht Supply offer an online provisioning catalogue and you can order from a large selection of groceries and other products months in advance, everything you order awaits for you at the marina.

Buy

Shopping malls

Eat

The most famous local delicates is Soparnik. It originates from nearby Poljica region (formerly known as Poljička Republika or Republic of Poljica in the Middle Ages). It is a dough filled with chard and baked in the fireplace. On top comes olive oil and garlic. You can find it on Pazar (green market).

Italian influences dominate on Croatia's coast, amongst the best are; Risotto with tender white scampi or black calamari, a dish beloved by all Croatians. A wide selection of salumi, magnificent Istrian and Dalmatian hams (Dalmatinski pršut - comparable to Parma or Speck) and cheese from the island of Pag, are well worth trying, as are the large varieties of excellent Croatian wines and beers.

Do not miss Dalmatian pašticada s njokama (Gnocchi).

Please note; in a world suffocating under the weight of processed foods, Croatia's coastal cuisine is unique in that most of its produce is organic.

Ćevapi or Ćevapčići (diminutive), are small grilled rolls of minced beef, pork, or lamb, or a combination of any of these three. Usually served with chopped onions, Kajmak (similar to clotted cream) or Ajvar (a relish made from bell peppers, aubergines, garlic and chilli). Ćevapi are traditional Bosnian dish and they are popular across the Balkans.

Split's eateries are to be found in a variety of settings, ranging from the romantic to the vibrant. It isn’t difficult to enjoy superb food and wine in a classical environment with good friends and/or family.

Plenty of fast food joints between the Old Town and the bus station.

Drink

Dalmatia is well known for its world class wines, but when in Split it is a must to try soda drinks called Pipi and Orela, produced by local beverage manufacturer Dalmacijavino.

Lots of outdoor cafés are to be found along the Riva seafront.

Nightclubs

There are many clubs on Bačvice beach.

Sleep

There is a wide variety of private accommodation available in Split, as well as a few hostels. Some of the best prices can probably be obtained by going to the bus station or ferry terminal and haggling with the many people there offering accommodation - even fairly late at night, there are still many people offering beds.

Budget

Hostels

Splurge

Stay safe

Do not go to striptease bars because they are a tourist trap.

Dentist

Connect

Internet access

There are internet cafés in the old centre of the city

There are several more Internet cafés by the harbour just north of the train station. One provides Ubuntu Linux.

There is free internet via WiFi in the People's Square next to the Lacoste store. Search for "Split Hotspot"

Go next

This article is issued from Wikivoyage - version of the Sunday, February 21, 2016. The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share Alike but additional terms may apply for the media files.