Siberia

Despite its reputation, Siberia is not just about cold snow!

Siberia (Russian: Сиби́рь see-BEER') is a region in Russia. Historically, Siberia included all Russian territory in north Asia, with the Urals and the Russian Far East; this article however covers the Siberian Federal District.

Regions

Cities

Lake Kutserla in the Altai Republic

Other destinations

Understand

See also: Russian Empire, Soviet Union

With an area of nearly 10 million sq km., Siberia is vast. While the popular view of Siberia is of howling Arctic wastes dotted with penal colonies, the truth is more complex. The west of Siberia is covered by a swampy plain, the central plateau is heavily forested, and the east has mountains soaring to above 3,000 m. Only the extreme north is true tundra, where temperatures can reach -68°C in winter.

Talk

The languages spoken in Siberia are varied, with many unique dialects. Simply knowing Russian may not always suffice when trying to communicate with people in the far eastern part.

Get in

By train

Krasnoyarsk station, near the midpoint of the Trans-Siberian Railway

The Trans-Siberian Railway, connecting Moscow to Vladivostok, is by far the most famous method of transportation in Siberia. Covering a distance of 9,289 kilometres, making it one of the longest railways in the world, the full trip takes over 6 days and crosses 8 time zones. Its branches the Trans-Manchurian and Trans-Mongolian connect to Beijing in China, the first directly, the second via Ulaanbaatar in Mongolia.

Less famed is the Baikal-Amur Mainline (BAM), a northern line running parallel to the Trans-Siberian for 4,234 km. Completed only in 1991 and built mostly for military reasons, further away from the border of China, the BAM is less popular with tourists.

See

Cold ostriches in Siberia

Primarily natural attractions.

Do

With its vast areas of wilderness, Siberia is a challenging destination for outdoor life.

Drink

Go next


This article is issued from Wikivoyage - version of the Saturday, February 13, 2016. The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share Alike but additional terms may apply for the media files.