Ravensburg

Pedestrian zone, Ravensburg

Ravensburg is a city in Baden Württemberg, Germany. Its main claim to fame is the boardgame company named after the town.

Get in

By plane

Ryanair offers direct flights from London, Liverpool and Dublin to Friedrichshafen airport, which is about 20 minutes away by train.

Most major European airlines offer regular scheduled flights to Stuttgart, Munich and Zurich airports, all of which are approximately 3 hours away by train. There are many intercontinental flights to Munich and Stuttgart has a direct connection to Atlanta in the USA.

By car

Ravensburg has fast road connections to Ulm and Friedrichshafen. The nearest motorway (Autobahn) junctions are at Wangen (20 miles) and Ulm (60 miles).

By train

Ravensburg station is on the Württembergische Südbahn Ulm–Friedrichshafen and the Bodensee-Oberschwaben-Bahn lines. The city's train station is a ten-minute walk from the main pedestrian precincts.

Get around

By train and bus

Being a small city, Ravensburg's public transport network consists solely of an excellent bus network and a regional train ("Bodensee Oberschwaben Bahn"). The main bus station is next to the train station, however, most bus routes also travel across the main square ("Marienplatz").

By foot

As most of the sites and places to stay are located in the city centre and the public transport network serves the city's suburbs, visitors to the city should be able to see everything without having to use the network.

The centre of the city is mainly pedestrianised. It is easy to explore the narrow streets, as the city centre is fairly compact. Some of the streets are quite steep.

Ravensburger AG, the company making the world-famous jigsaw puzzles and board games, has a museum devoted to its history in the old town

See

Ravensburg's historic city centre is completely intact, due to the city being able to escape bomb damage during World War 2.

Ravensburg is famous for its many towers and church spires. Two of the towers ("Blaserturm" on the main square and "Mehlsack" at the top end of the city centre) are open to the public for a small fee, however, there are many steep stairs to climb to get to the top.

Ravensburg offers a fantastic amount of ancient buildings and churches, some of which are used for retail and some of which are open to the public. The main tourist information office is located just off the main square next to the church of our lady ("Liebfrauenkirche").

There are several museums dotted around the city and several churches, all of which are open to the public.

Do

There is plenty to do in Ravensburg, there is a fantastic amount of shops, cafes and bars, which are all located on and around the main square.

Buy

Ravensburg is famous locally for being a shopper's paradise. There are several large department stores, all located just off the main square. There is also a small shopping centre ("Gänsbühl"), which is a short walk from the main square. There are also many smaller shops selling everything one can think of, however, many of these, particularly the clothes and shoe shops, are very expensive, offering expensive designer articles.

Eat

The centre of Ravensburg is absolutely full of restaurants. There is a fantastic Balkan restaurant located at the bottom end of the "Bachstrasse" shopping street. Other restaurants include American, Chinese, Indian, Italian and German establishments. Restaurant food in Germany is very reasonably priced and is usually accompanied by a wholesome salad. There are some "all you can eat" establishments, mainly in Grüner-Turm-Strasse, where there are also lots of Ethnic fast food restaurants.

Drink

The city centre of Ravensburg is crammed full of bars and pubs. Most of the pubs and cafés on Marienplatz are fashionable and a bit expensive. In Summer and also on sunny days in Winter, hundereds of people sit in the outdoor areas on the square and it can become difficult to even get a seat.

Sleep

Ravensburg offers the traveller some good hotels.

Go next


This article is issued from Wikivoyage - version of the Wednesday, January 20, 2016. The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share Alike but additional terms may apply for the media files.