N'Djamena

N'Djamena is the capital of Chad. It is by far the country's largest city, with a population of 721,000 people. It lies directly on the border of Cameroon, and is located on the confluence of the Chari and Logone rivers. The city has been at the centre of many heated rebellions and revolts, and in February 2008 was entered by rebel troops.

Get in

N'Djamena street
People on horseback in Fort Lamy, Chad
Bridge in Chad
N'djamena city scene

The only flight from a non-African city is from Paris (by Air France). Destinations in Africa include Johannesburg, Addis Ababa, Tripoli, Cotonou, Bangui, Lagos, Casablanca via Niamey and Khartoum. Historically, the main entry to the city was by boat up the Chari and Logone rivers, but today this is rarely done. The city has no railway links.

See

A Muslim city, there are many mosques to see in the city, as well as a cathedral and the presidential palace. And do not forget the views across the river. Sunset can be quite spectacular.

Do

Go shopping in the local markets- even if only for an afternoon snack- that are scattered throughout the city. This lets you experience the everyday life and culture of Chad, and also helps contributes to the country's poor economy.

Drink

Chad is a predominantly Islamic country, so do not expect alcohol to be as widely accepted as in some other countries.

Sleep

Cope

Embassies

Go next

Gaoui is a pretty village lying 10km north east of N'Djamena. It is said to have been the capital of the Sao civilisation and is now known for its traditional architecture and pottery manufacture. It is also home to a museum.

N'Djamena has the only international airport in Chad. Leaving the main city may be dangerous, as high levels of civil unrest are currently being experienced in the country. Travelling to the Tibesti Mountains is not safe, either, as this is a militarily sensitive zone. As in all third world countries, stay safe and have caution in your actions.

This article is issued from Wikivoyage - version of the Monday, November 16, 2015. The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share Alike but additional terms may apply for the media files.