Mindanao

WARNING: If traveling to the ARMM, please see the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao's page.

Mindanao is an island in the Philippines, the southermost major island in the country and the second largest, after Luzon.

Regions

Mindanao Island in red
Associated islands in maroon

For administrative purposes, the Philippine government divides the country into three main regions Luzon, the Visayas and Mindanao. The Mindanao administrative region inludes Mindanao Island (shown in red on the map) plus a number of smaller ones nearby (in maroon); the Sulu Islands are off to the southwest while Dinagat and Siargao are to the north.

Regions we use are:

Cities

Other destinations

Understand

How dangerous is Mindanao?

Western governments all advise caution anywhere on Mindanao, and all agree that travellers should avoid the ARMM and Zamboanga Peninsula; see the warnings in those articles. Most suggest avoiding various other areas as well.

See these advisories:
Australia Canada Ireland NZ UK US
See also our article on War zone safety if you plan to travel in high-risk areas.

On the other hand, there are some western travellers anywhere in eastern or northern Mindanao, and cities like Davao and CDO have quite a few foreign residents. Most of these people have encountered few problems and feel reasonably safe.

Mindanao has a long, complex and remarkably colorful history.

Off the southwest end of Mindanao are the Sulu Islands, a chain leading almost all the way to Sabah, now the easternmost province of Malaysia, and there has always been trade between Mindanao and Borneo. The Sulus and western Mindanao are predominantly Muslim to this day; this is the heartland of the Moro (Filipino Muslim) people, though there is also a substantial Muslim minority on Palawan and there are some Muslims anywhere in the Philippines.

Until the late 19th century, almost the entire northern coast of Borneo and parts of the Philippines more-or-less everything from Sarawak to Mindanao was ruled by pirate kings. The town of Jolo, on Sulu, had a great slave market. The Spanish, the British, the Sultan of Brunei, and later the Americans fought wars against the pirate kingdoms and eventually shut them down, but it was quite a struggle.

Pirates from Mindanao often raided towns in other parts of the Philippines. Towns like Altavas and Bolinao were built inland to avoid them, while others had fortifications or a warning system like the Dumaguete bell tower. This may not be entirely ended; as recently as 2001 a group based in Basilan grabbed 20 hostages near Puerto Princesa in Palawan and eventually murdered several.

The Moros vigorously resisted Spanish, American and Japanese rule for several reasons: Moro nationalism, anti-colonialism, Islam, and piracy. Today some are still resisting the Philippine government. The Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) was established in 1989 to give them partial independence, and a peace deal between the government and the largest Moro militia group (Moro Islamic Liberation Front or MILF) was signed in 2012. However there are still armed rebel groups in some areas and a substantial Philippine military presence to suppress them; the two sides reportedly have ties to Al Qaeda and the CIA respectively.

Get in

Plane

Cebu Pacific and Philippines airlines fly between Manila and many airports in Mindanao.

Air Asia fly from Manila to Davao three times a day.

Cebu Pacific and Philippines airlines fly from Cebu city to many airports in Mindanao.

Cebu Pacific fly from Iloilo to Cagayan de Oro, Davao and General Santos.

Cebu Pacific fly from Bacolod to Davao three times a week.

Cebu Pacific fly from Singapore to Davao two times a week

Ferry

Surigao, Zamboanga. most go via Iloilo or Bacolod or Cebu city .

and Surigao city.

Cagayan de Oro. and from Cebu to Butuan and Ozamiz.

Get around

The main bus lines in Mindanao island are Bachelor Express and sister bus line, Rural Transit, which go to most places in Mindanao island.

Stay safe

See the information box in the Understand section.

Go next


This article is issued from Wikivoyage - version of the Wednesday, March 30, 2016. The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share Alike but additional terms may apply for the media files.