Killarney

For other places with the same name, see Killarney (disambiguation).

Killarney is a small town in southwest Ireland. Situated on the Ring of Kerry scenic drive, it's one of Ireland's leading tourist destinations because of the abundant lake and mountain scenery in Killarney National Park.

Ross Castle in Killarney National Park

Understand

Killarney has been entertaining visitors and tourists for over two hundred and fifty years. Its beautiful peaks such as Crohane, Tomies, Torc, and Mangerton date way back to prehistoric times when the ice melted after the ice age. There are many tales and legends concerning the town which draw in tourists.

It has charming architecture and style reminiscent of the late nineteenth century. Since the council banned gaudy plastic shop signs in the 1980s, there has been a strong competitive streak among shop keepers to put on an attractive face, with old style signs, window boxes, and stained-glass doors.

The town has many narrow lanes which are sometimes hard to navigate but bring about opportunities to stumble upon new adventures. Many restaurants and craft shops are hidden down these lanes and it is well worth the effort to explore.

Get in

By plane

There are regular flights from London, Airport Frankfurt-Hahn and Dublin to the small international airport at Farranfore 10 km (6 mi) to the north of Killarney.

By train

Killarney is on the Dublin-Tralee and the Cork - Tralee railways. It is about 3.5 hr from Dublin and about an hour and a half from Cork. You might be required to transfer trains at Mallow in County Cork. The train station is only a few hundred metres from the centre of town.

By car

Killarney is situated approximately two hours from Shannon Airport, one and a half hours drive from Cork Airport and 4 and half hours drive from Dublin Airport. It's possible to rent a car from any one of these places or to drive directly to Ireland via ferry from the United Kingdom or Europe.

By bus

The bus station is located next to the train station, although they use different entrances. The bus station is beside the Outlet Centre opposite the Friary. For the train station, go between the Outlet Centre and the Malton Hotel (formerly The Great Southern Hotel).

By taxi

There are nearly always taxi cabs available from the rank, outside McSorleys bar and niteclub. Local numbers to call are +353 64 37676, and +353 64 37444, to name but a few.

Get around

By bicycle

The Meeting of the Waters

Cycling is an ideal way to see the Killarney National Park. There are paved bicycle paths in Muckross, Knockreer and Ross Island.

If you do not have a bicycle, there are several places in Killarney where you can rent them. O' Sullivans Cycles, located across from the Tourist Office, charges €15 to rent a bike for the day.

Put on your runners...

Killarney town can easily be covered by foot. It is a mere ten minute walk from the town centre to The Demesne at the entrance of the National Park. There are many beautiful sign-posted walks you can follow from there. If you are a parent, there is a new enclosed playground two minutes walk from the main gate by the river, with play areas divided up by age group.

See

Cross in the South Transept of Muckross Abbey, Killarney National Park
Pigs at Muckross Traditional Farms

Do

Buy

Eat

Drink

Sleep

Killarney has a huge variety of accommodation available for visitors, from top of the range luxury 5 star hotels to comfortable B&B's and hostel accommodation. There's something to suit every budget.

Stay safe

Like all tourist towns, Killarney can get very busy, so remember, safety in numbers. There can be a lot of noisy trouble-makers on the streets when the clubs close in the early hours of the morning, and it may take time to get a taxi then. Stay on the main streets late at night and avoid the laneways. The better hotels may have a car available to pick you up and return you to your accommodation. In case of trouble call the local police (known as the 'Garda') +353 64 663-1222.

The mountain scenery is lovely, but sudden weather changes can be dangerous. Don't go fell walking or mountain climbing without local advice and a decent set of warm, waterproof clothes. Make sure a responsible person knows where you are going.

Go next


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