Kasaragod District

Kasaragod District http://kasargod.nic.in/ is the northernmost part of Malabar region in Kerala, India.

Chandra Giri river
Ummachi Theyyam

Cities

Other destinations

Understand

Kasaragod district has of 1.3 million multilingual people. Malayalam, Tulu and Kannada are widely spoken here. Beary, Konkani, Marathi, Hindi, English and Urdu are also understood. Most of the people are either Muslims or Hindus. Kasaragod is a rich district of Kerala because of the remittance of locals working in Middle Eastern countries.

Kasaragod district has a lot of coconut plantations and paddy fields. There are several rolling hills near the beaches. The eastern hills are very serene and peaceful whereas the western coast is overdeveloped and suffering from extreme traffic congestion. The climate is hot and humid except from November to February. Heavy rain can be expected between June and September.

Get in

Thangal uppalla mosque at Nellikkunnu, Kaasaragod, Kerala.

Buses are available from Mangalore and Kannur. Kasaragod railway station has direct trains from Delhi, Mumbai, Bangalore, Chennai and Thiruvananthapuram. The nearest airport is at Mangalore.

Main Routes

Get around

See

Do

Kasaragod is often named as land of Lords and Forts and one of the most beautiful districts in Kerala state endowed with 9 rivers (out of a total of the 44 rivers that flow in Kerala), hills, beaches, backwaters, as well as temples, churches, mosques and forts.

Eat

Udupi-style vegetarian food is very popular in the restaurants of Kasaragod. Kerala-style Muslim food is also available in non-vegetarian restaurants.

Drink

Beer and wine are available. Hard drinks are prohibited.

Stay safe

Kasaragod is a safe place but the towns have a tendency to get deserted after 8.00 p.m. because of communal clashes and political violence. They are not targeted towards the tourists. The coastal people are rude and the hill people are polite and nosy.

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This article is issued from Wikivoyage - version of the Thursday, January 21, 2016. The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share Alike but additional terms may apply for the media files.