Detroit/Downtown

Downtown Detroit is the central business district of Detroit, bordered by the Lodge Freeway to the west, the Fisher Freeway to the north, Interstate 375 to the east, and the Detroit River to the south. The area contains most of the prominent skyscrapers in Detroit, the nation's second largest theatre district, several parks, many of which are linked by the Detroit International Riverfront, three casinos, and much more that is sure to make your visit a unique and memorable one.

Understand

Brush Street in downtown Detroit

Anyone who visits downtown Detroit will be pleasantly surprised to see one of America's best preserved collection of late nineteenth and early twentieth century buildings standing beside the contemporary. Casino resorts add an air of excitement to the entertainment hub of the region. The International Riverfront is teaming with activity. Restaurant clusters emanate from Greektown, the Renaissance Center, and downtown stadiums. Downtown, with its revitalized riverfront area, has evolved into a popular place to reside with many new high rise lofts and restored historic homes. In the past decade, the area and the entire city has seen many historic buildings renovated, many parks open, and much more.

Get in

By car

The most popular way of getting to Detroit is by car. The area has many parking garages and is easy to access from the freeways, parking prices aren't bad.

By bus

Detroit is often overlooked as having no transit system, when in reality it has two bus systems and a Downtown People Mover. The Rosa Parks Transit Center is the central hub of the Detroit Department of Transportation (DDOT). Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transit (SMART) buses also serve the transit center. Look up bus times at transit.google.com

After arriving at the transit center, hop on the people mover by walking either south to the Michigan Ave Station or north to the Times Square Station. The people mover is the easiest way of getting around Downtown.

The first segment of a light-rail system was planned for Woodward Ave, but as of 2011 this proposal had been abandoned in favour of bus rapid transit.

See

The Renaissance Center from the Detroit International Riverfront

Historic neighborhoods

Buildings on Washington Boulevard, including the Book Tower which is the tallest among them

Parks and monuments

Looking up the David Broderick Tower at Grand Circus Park
Michigan Labor Monument in front of 1001 Woodward and Comerica Tower at Hart Plaza

Architecture

Detroit is home to one of the world's largest collections of late nineteenth and early twentieth century buildings. During the past decade, the city has restored many of its architecturally significant buildings. Several of Detroit's buildings are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Detroit is definitely one the best destinations for architecture buffs.

Buildings

The Westin Book-Cadillac Hotel
Wayne County Building

Churches

Do

The Windsor-Detroit International Freedom Festival celebrates Canada Day and U.S. Independence Day

Events

Gambling

Detroit is the largest American city to offer casino resorts.

The Greektown Casino Hotel

Theater

Foxtown, located along Woodward Avenue, is the nickname of Detroit's theater district. The name comes from the city's Fox Theatre, which is the largest of the nation's fox theaters. Foxtown is home to dozens of performing arts venues. It is the second largest theater district in the United States, after New York City's Broadway. The theater district lies in the northern end of downtown Detroit, bordering Midtown. The nearest People Mover stations to the area are the Grand Circus Park Station, which is located at Park Street, near Woodward Avenue, and the Broadway Station, which is located at the corner of Broadway and John R. Some of the more popular theaters include:

Sports

Enjoying a Tigers game

Buy

Eat

Monroe Street in Greektown

Greektown

Explore Detroit's Greektown, with its Greek restaurants and shops surrounding the Greektown Casino.

Pizza

Detroit is known for its "Detroit-Style" Pizza:

Coney Island

The rival Coney Islands

Detroit is known for the greasy and messy Coney Island hot dog and for its Coney Island Restaurants which are open very late or even 24 hours to catch the late-night bar crowd.

Mid-range

Splurge

Drink

Sleep

Budget

Mid-range

Splurge

Go next

This article is issued from Wikivoyage - version of the Thursday, March 10, 2016. The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share Alike but additional terms may apply for the media files.