Caracas

A view of Caracas valley from El Avlia National Park.

Caracas is the capital and largest city of Venezuela. It is located in northern Venezuela, near the Caribbean.

Understand

Venezuela’s urban spirit can be discovered mainly from understanding Caracas, its capital city.

Caracas is not one of the top touristic destinations of Venezuela, and travelers often bypass the capital city in order to see the country’s amazing natural attractions. However, the Venezuelan capital can be a fascinating city to explore, replete with excellent art, food and a bustling nightlife.

Caracas is located in a beautiful valley, overlooked by Mount Avila, an impressive mountain that separates the city from the Caribbean Sea and shapes most of the city’s landscape. It is a popular weekend destination for the city’s residents (known as Caraqueños) and is easily reached by taking a very modern cable car that goes all the way from the mountain base to the newly nationalized Waraira Repano park, which is situated at the top of the mountain.

In Caracas the staggering inequalities of wealth that characterize Venezuela’s economic situation are on display. They range from very poor neighborhoods in the hills west of the city called “barrios”, to the modern business district of El Rosal, or even the huge mansions of the rich eastern neighborhoods.

The city’s streets and highways are always crowded with vehicles, as Venezuela has the cheapest gasoline in the world (at about $0.12/gallon). Subsidized gasoline and inadequate infrastructure have helped spur pollution and big traffic lines in almost all of the inner city motorways. Caracas’ subway system, once one of the best in all Latin America, is still quick but is often crowded and prone to delays.

Visitors need to be aware that Caracas remains one of the most violent cities in the world, with large parts of the city effectively No Go Areas to outsiders. Murder tallies of as many as 20 are not uncommon on weekends, so exercising caution and common sense - especially at night - is essential to a safe visit.

Entertainment and nightlife

Caracas is a cosmopolitan city and is admired for its gastronomy. It has restaurants and bars inspired by the cuisine of many different countries and cultures due to great waves of immigration from Europe and the Middle East after the Second World War.

The city is filled with “centros comerciales” and department stores, and the popular restaurants and clubs in the towering malls due to security concerns. In the San Ignacio Mall you’ll find the city’s young, rich and beautiful drinking whiskey and “Las Mercedes” and “La Castellana” districts are also popular late night hot spots.

People often party until 4 or 5 o’clock in the morning, so it’s advisable to take a cab when heading out.

Climate

 Climate Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
 
Daily highs (°C) 23.3 23.6 24.3 25.0 25.8 26.0 25.5 25.8 25.5 25.2 24.6 23.8
Nightly lows (°C) 15.9 15.8 16.0 17.5 18.2 18.1 17.9 18.1 18.3 18.4 18.0 16.5
Precipitation (mm) 15.3 13.2 11.4 59.2 81.7 134.1 118.4 123.8 115.4 126.3 72.6 41.4

Source:w:Caracas#Climate

Caracas has a tropical climate with very little variation between summer and winter temperatures. Set in a valley some 900 meters above sea level, its climate is often described as its best feature: never cold, seldom too hot. Average daily temperature in summer ranges from a minimum of 18˚C (64˚F) to a maximum of 28˚C (82˚F). Winter temperatures are only two to three degrees cooler. Most rainfall occurs during the period from May to November and can be accompanied by electrical storms.

Get in

By plane

Maiquetía's Simón Bolívar Airport has three passenger terminals (Internacional, Nacional and Auxiliar) and is 25 km away from central Caracas via a highway through the coastal mountains. A new road bridge, replacing one that collapsed in 2006, came into service in July 2007, ending months of tortuous journeys to and from the airport. The trip to Caracas should now take around 40 minutes or up to 60–70 minutes during rush hour.

This international airport is served by American Airlines, Aeropostal, Aerolíneas Argentinas, Avianca, Aero República, Air Europa, Alitalia, Air France, Air Canada, United, Delta, Caribbean Airlines, Copa Airlines, Iberia, LAN, and Lufthansa among others. Non stop flights are available to and from Miami, New York, Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, Havana, Curaçao, Madrid, Damascus, Guayaquil, Buenos Aires, Oporto. Santiago, Paris, Roma, Funchal, Milano, Frankfurt, Lisbon, Aruba, Bogotá, Medellín, Cartagena de Indias, Port of Spain, Rio de Janeiro, Panamá City, Lima, São Paulo, Fort de France, Toronto and other cities.

Taxi fares are continuously increasing due to the rampant inflation. As of May 2013, taxi fares are usually BsF 350 (US $55 at official rate, around US $13 at "tourist" rate) to Caracas but there are many unlicensed taxis offering their services and travelers should exercise caution. In particular, it is advised to agree on a price before getting into the taxi, not sharing with anyone other than the driver, with a preference given to the airport's official black Ford Explorer cabs. Check with your hotel to see if they arrange airport pickup - it may need to be booked in advance. There is also a new taxi service that you can book online at TaxiToCaracas.

In and around the airport there are ATMs, currency exchange houses (charging the official rate) and unofficial brokers willing to provide BsFs at a more advantageous rate (but not the best rate that you can find on internet sites).

By car

Nice and pretty highways connect Caracas with La Guaira and the airport to the north; Maracay, Valencia and Maracaibo in the west; Barcelona and Puerto La Cruz in the east.

While driving in Caracas can be a hectic experience, renting a car to experience the outlying areas is a wonderful way to leave behind the well-traveled routes.

Car rental is available in the following locations:

By bus

A taxi from the bus terminal to the center will cost you around BsF 200.

Buses from the airport to Caracas cost between BsF 50 and BsF 100. Passengers have the option of alighting either at Gato Negro metro station (somewhat unsafe at street level) or under a bridge at the Parque Central bus terminal, from where you'll need to get a taxi to your final destination or walk about 1 km along a busy road to the Bellas Artes metro station.

There is also a new government-run bus service to the Alba Hotel in Bellas Artes, which costs BsF 40. Passengers do not need to be guests at Alba. Further information is available from the two tourist board offices in the international terminal of Maiquetía airport.

The La Bandera bus terminal connects Caracas with towns and cities to the west of the capital such as La Victoria (1 hour), Maracay (1.5 hours), Valencia (2.5 hours) and Mérida (~12 hours). The 800m walk from La Bandera metro station to the bus terminal is unsafe after dark and travelers should exercise caution at all times. For the eastern part of the country there's the Terminal del Oriente. Beware of the small "independent" bus services which are announced by "voceros" on both terminals. Although they have more flexible departure times, the buses can be small and uncomfortable, with speakers that blast loud music even at night.

There are also private carriers that offer more comfort. They also cost a little more. The most well known are Aeroexpresos Ejecutivos, Expresos Alianza and Expresos del Oriente, which operate from their own private terminals, something to consider if you plan on transferring for a destination they don’t cover.

Get around

Taxis can be easily hailed in the street and are generally (but not always) safe. They have no meters so prices should be agreed on before getting in. Some reports indicate that the situation has improved and there are fixed rates posted. Caracas traffic is notoriously bad and the metro is a better option if your destination is conveniently located near a station. Licensed taxis have yellow plates and while some private cars with white plates are taxis too, it’s generally safer to take a licensed cab.

Venezuelan taxi cab drivers may quote you about double the actual price when you ask how much a ride will be. Bargaining is totally acceptable in this case. Simply respond with a more reasonable price that you are willing to pay, and it’s more than likely you can meet in the middle. If the taxi driver continues to quote an outrageous price, simply walk away and try another.

The Caracas metro is clean, modern, safe and extremely cheap. A single journey costs just BsF 4, "ida y vuelta" (round trip) is BsF 8.00 and a 10 journey "multi abono" ticket is BsF 36. Because prices have changed little in recent years and bus fares have outpaced inflation, the metro is frequently overcrowded, particularly during peak hours.

The metro system is backed up by a network of metrobuses that depart from certain metro stations and take fixed routes to areas of the city not reached by the underground. Like the metro, metrobuses are cheap and clean, but passengers complain of bus shortages. Most services run only about every 20 minutes. The buses have fixed stops and will not pick up passengers elsewhere.

The ubiquitous minibuses, or por puestos, run along many main roads in Caracas, often ending up in obscure residential neighborhoods that are not accessible by metro. They can be flagged down anywhere and you can generally ask the driver to let you jump off whenever he stops, such as traffic lights. Although sometimes useful (for reaching the Sabas Nieves entrance to El Avila from the Altamira metro station) the buses are more expensive than the metro (BsF 10.0 for a single ride), slower, less safe, and are invariably in a very bad condition.

See

Parque del Este
Inside the world heritage-listed university complex

Caracas has more than enough sights and attractions to fill three or four days although it is often overlooked by international travelers.

Do

A view of Caracas from near the top of the Teleferico

Buy

Most ATMs will ask you the last two numbers of a local ID, type 00 when it asks this to make withdrawal with a foreign card possible. CitiBank's ATMs don't ask this information. There is one CitiBank branch in El Recreo shopping mall, Avenida Casanova, in Sabana Grande.

Money

Bolivares fuertes.

The government of Venezuela implemented foreign exchange controls in 2003 including a fixed official rate of exchange against the U.S. dollar: 6.30 Bolivar Fuertes to 1 US Dollar. Foreign exchange transactions must take place through exchange houses or commercial banks at the official rate. Unfortunately, it is no longer possible to exchange money at hotels. Currency exchange for tourists can be arranged at "casas de cambio" (exchange houses), located near most major hotels. It is also possible to exchange money at commercial banks; however, tourists should be aware that the exchange will not be immediate. Exchanges through commercial banks must first be approved by the Commission for Administration of Foreign Currencies (CADIVI). This requires a registration process, which delays the exchange. The exchange control mechanisms also require the exchange houses and commercial banks to obtain authorization from CADIVI to trade Bolívares Fuertes (BsF, the local currency) into U.S. dollars or Euros.

It’s likely that travelers will encounter Venezuelans who are willing to exchange Bolívares Fuertes for U.S. dollars or Euros at a rate significantly higher than the official rate of exchange. These "parallel market" currency exchanges are prohibited under the Venezuelan foreign exchange controls. Travelers engaging in such activity may be detained by the Venezuelan authorities if they are discovered. Additionally, in accordance with an October 2005 law, any person who exchanges more than 10,000 U.S. dollars (or its equivalent in other currencies) in the course of a year through unofficial means is subject to a fine of double the amount exchanged. If the amount exceeds 20,000 U.S. dollars the penalty is two to six years imprisonment. Any person who transports more than 10,000 U.S. dollars into or out of Venezuela by any means must declare this amount to customs officials.

Within the "Parallel Market" there are various exchange rates: the tourist, the black market (a bit higher but dangerous and shady), and the bonds brokerage one (high amounts in government bonds, when on sale). That highest one, which appears as reference on certain internet pages, is the government dollar bonds rate, inaccessible unless you buy thousands of dollars in government bonds through a Venezuelan brokerage firm. This last one determines the rate of the black market one and the tourist one. Once you change you cannot change back to euros or dollars. The rates vary around Venezuela and from week to week. The tourist rate rarely varies in time. The tourist rate is 160 to the dollar (as of December 2014). Note that these rates are multiple times the official rate.

Credit cards are generally accepted at most establishments, but foreign exchange controls have made foreign credit card use less common than in the past, mostly because of the unfavorable official exchange rate. Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Diners Club have representatives in Venezuela. Due to the prevalence of credit card fraud, travelers should exercise caution in using their credit cards and should check statements regularly to ensure that no unauthorized charges have been made. Caracas has ATMs with 24-hour service where users may withdraw local currency, but many of these ATMs may not accept foreign-issued debit cards.

Eat

Pabellon criollo.

Las Mercedes

La Castellana

Altamira

La Candelaria

Drink

Hotel Shelter Suites, Av Libertador and Av Jose Felix Sosa, Chacao (opposite Sambil shopping mall),  +58 212 265-3860. Individual listings of clubs, bars, pubs, etc are preferred here. Rooms starting at $100.

Exclusive modern nightclubs:

Sleep

Caracas has many hotels, but lacks youth hostels found in other South American countries. Backpackers will find that Caracas is not a cheap destination and there are not rooms available in the 20-30 USD typical hostel range. While the whole of the city is considered to be dangerous at night, it’s preferable to stay near Sabana Grande or farther east.

Many hotels in the Sabana Grande area will offer rooms on an hourly basis (euphemistically known as love hotels) which are primarily for unmarried Venezuelan couples.

Budget

Most hotels are in Sabana Grande, which is the geographic center of the city or midtown. The true downtown or historic city center, is known as "el centro", which is not a good place to stay. While Sabana Grande has affordable hotel rates (from $100–400 five-star), you need to be wary of occasional street crime in the form of purse snatching (on women) and pick-pocketing. Anyway, the Sabana Grande Boulevard sports high-shining lamp posts and police officers along the way. However, crooked cops are also known to sometimes harass hippie-looking travelers during the day, searching for drugs . Sabana Grande is a pleasantly walkable promenade, fantastic for people-watching and casual shopping. As for the large shopping malls around Sabana Grande, they are absolutely safe, especially one known as El Recreo. All this makes Sabana Grande one of the best place to stay for many. Neighborhoods further east or south such as Altamira and Las Mercedes offer safer accommodations, but at a much increased cost.

Mid-range

Splurge

Stay safe

Violent crime in Caracas is a major problem, and it has been getting steadily worse during the recent years: Caracas is now by some counts the world's most dangerous city, with 7,676 murders in 2009. In case you are robbed, simply hand over what is asked of you. For this reason it is advisable to carry a “decoy” wallet with small bills (around $50). Most thieves carry guns and they will use them regardless of the consequences (there is a sense of immunity due to poor policing).

Stick to the tourist areas and dress like the average Venezuelans (jeans and short-sleeved shirt) and do not wear any expensive looking jewelry. The barrios (poor neighborhoods/shantytowns) are to be avoided. They are mostly built into the hills around the west side of Caracas, similar to the favelas in Brazil. These neighborhoods are extremely dangerous, but they are far from the main tourist areas.

Kidnapping is a major problem for upper-class Venezuelans, but is unlikely to be a concern for travelers. As with many other developing nations, petty theft is a problem. Ask hotel management to store your valuables when you leave your room and use a money belt for your passport/extra cash when traveling.

The police tend to be corrupt, including at the international airport. According to the Lonely Planet guide: "Avoid the blue uniformed police. The only 'safe' police are the Chacao police with tan yellow uniforms". However, Venezuelans in general are friendly and helpful.

Connect

There are many "Centros de Conexiones" in which you can easily make domestic and international calls. There is also a growing number of internet cafes.

Cope

Caracas has been the staging ground of violent political conflict in the last few years, as well as suffering from a high incidence of crime. While taking appropriate precautions (dressing down, keeping valuables out of sight and avoiding dangerous areas) will probably keep you out of harm's way, paranoia abounds. Traveling with a partner or in groups is advisable.

Embassies

Go next

Sunset in La Guaira.

El Litoral, or the narrow band of coast between El Avila and the Caribbean Sea, is also known at the State of Vargas and the location of the best airport hotels. These beaches are not well known with visitors but are popular with Caraqueños on weekends. The area has been slow to recover from the disastrous mudslides of December 1999 which ironically made the beaches better. Still they are of lesser quality than the beaches of Choroni, Morrocoy, Mochima or Margarita.

This article is issued from Wikivoyage - version of the Sunday, February 07, 2016. The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share Alike but additional terms may apply for the media files.