Belgrade

For other places with the same name, see Belgrade (disambiguation).

Belgrade (Serbian: Београд, Beograd) — meaning 'White City' — is the capital of the Republic of Serbia. Various styles of architecture dominate the city, while its recent resurgence as the leading hub in south-eastern Europe makes it a must see destination.

Understand

Belgrade's districts and neighbourhoods
Knez Mihajlova, one of the most popular pedestrian-only streets in Belgrade

Belgrade is the capital of the Republic of Serbia and is, as such, the country's largest city with a population of about 1.7 million people. It lies on the confluence of the Sava and Danube rivers. The city has a long history, dating back to the 4th century BC, when the area was settled by Celtic tribes. Later on, it became the Roman city of Singidunum, and relics of that era can still be seen in the city, particularly at Kalemegdan Fortress. During the Middle Ages the town became a Serbian stronghold until the Ottoman invasion. The city changed hands between the Ottomans and the Austrians several times until 1878, when Serbia got its independence and Belgrade became the capital of the new country.

After the First World War, Belgrade became the seat of Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (in 1929, the country changed name to Kingdom of Yugoslavia) until its collapse, and it saw violence again in 1999 with NATO's bombing campaign. This often violent history and outside influence has colored much of Belgrade's evolution, which is evident in its culture and architecture. Often caught between the hammer and anvil of clashing empires, the city has taken on a unique character, reminiscent of both Austrian and Turkish influences, with a unique set of Communist elements thrown in as Yugoslavia was expelled from the Eastern Bloc in 1948 but followed its own brand of Communism until the years following Marshal Tito's death in 1980. Yet, the city has its own spirit, and in it can be found some not only unique features, but also a healthy joie de vivre in its café culture, nightlife and often Mediterranean flavor in its view of life.

Whilst there isn't much ethnic or cultural diversity in Belgrade compared to other European cities, there are minority communities (largely Roma and Chinese), as well as people from other former Yugoslav republics, such as Bosnia, Croatia and Macedonia. There is also a small expat community. Cultural events from around the world, however, are starting to become increasingly common, particularly in the spring and summer months, due to both local arts and culture organizations, as well as foreign embassies/cultural centers. These attract a good deal of local attention, and will help in raising the city's profile as a cultural hotspot.

Belgrade is an energetic city re-discovering its tourism potential.

Get in

Building of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts

By plane

Belgrade Nikola Tesla Airport (IATA: BEG) is 18 km (11 mi) west of the city center, and the home base of Air Serbia (IATA:JU), which flies to nearly 40 destinations worldwide. Other major airlines that fly to Belgrade are Aeroflot, Qatar Airways, Turkish, Lufthansa, Austrian, Alitalia and Swiss. Turkish Airlines offers twice daily flights to Istanbul. Discount and no-frills carriers offer modest number of flights. Wizz Air has direct flights from London, Eindhoven, Memmingen, Gothenburg, Malmö, Charleroi, Rome, Stockholm, Dusseldorf and Dortmund to Belgrade. Istanbul-based Pegasus connects Belgrade to Istanbul's smaller airport Sabiha Gökçen with great connections to many European and Eurasian cities. Germanwings does have a number of less expensive flights to cities across Europe and Norwegian Air is another low cost airline operating to Belgrade. easyJet flies from Milan. Flyniki offers low cost flight from and to Vienna. SpanAir offers direct flights from Barcelona and Madrid to Belgrade. airBaltic offers direct flights from Riga to Belgrade. SkyWorks flies directly from Bern. For travellers from Asia/Middle East, the low cost airline FlyDubai offers cheap direct connections from India, Sri Lanka and other destinations to Belgrade via Dubai. For a full list of carriers see Serbia#By plane.

To travel between the airport and the city:

Website of Nikola Tesla Airport with information on how to get to/from Belgrade, check the bar on the left side of the page.

By train

Serbian Railways operates trains in Serbia. The central train station is1–2 km (1–1 mi) (steep uphill) from Republic Square - about 15 minutes walk. Almost all national and international trains stop here, but a few trains stop at Novi Beograd/New Belgrade station, 5 km (3 mi) west from the city center. It is best to by tickets at the train station and in advance as train do sell out.

By bus

Belgrade's central bus station is next-door to the central train station, in Karađorđeva street. Whilst coach service to national and international destinations is frequent, departure times are usually reliable, but arrival times may be not. Timetables aren't clearly posted; the timetables that are there are in Serbian only, so ask for information inside the terminal.

When buying a bus ticket, you will also receive a token to enter the platform area, for national travel. For international travel, you will be given a paper stub to present at the platform gate.

Be aware that most coach drivers will charge you a fee of approximately 100 dinar per bag for baggage handling in the cargo compartment, though this is not a uniform practice with international travel. Also be aware that drivers rarely speak English or any other foreign language. Inform yourself about your trip prior to departure as much as you can; if in doubt, ask a fellow passenger for assistance.

Coach travel in Serbia is a hit-and-miss experience; whilst there is a huge number of companies to chose from, not all of them have clean, modern coach fleets, particularly for travel within Serbia or to neighbouring Montenegro. Coaches are more often clean and modern when embarking on trips to Croatia and Western Europe.

For international trips to the rest of Europe, Lasta is the Eurolines carrier.

For long trips, drivers usually stop for 15 min breaks roughly every two hours, though this isn't by any means guaranteed. Pack appropriately with food and bottled water. When disembarking on breaks in the trip, make sure to either secure your belongings, or take them with you.

When you get off the bus, you might be offered a taxi ride or baggage-carrying by some strange people. Be wary of accepting these offers. They may be illegal and the intention may be to rip you off.

By car

Coming north from Subotica and Novi Sad, the E-75 highway is recommended, as well as driving to Belgrade from the south. There is also a major road called Ibarska magistrala (Ibar highway, M-22), which provides approach from south-west (direction of Montenegro, for example). From the west, use the E-70 highway (from Zagreb, Ljubljana etc.). Major roads can be used coming east and north-east from Vršac and Zrenjanin.

Highways have toll stations, which are moderately priced. Serbia's only highways are parts of E-70 and E-75 roads and the highway passes right through Belgrade, causing traffic jams on the Gazela bridge and at the Mostar junction. These jams have been reduced somewhat in recent years by redirecting heavy goods vehicles to the Belgrade Bypass and by the new Ada Bridge. See the infobox for more information on transiting Belgrade.

Belgrade Bypass

When travelling by car from Western and Central Europe to Greece, Bulgaria or Turkey, the route almost inevitably goes through or near Belgrade. If you have decided not to visit the city itself, but to continue straight to, say, Thessaloniki, you might be tempted to use the southern Belgrade Bypass by following the green Niš signs before entering Belgrade. However, as of summer 2014 the bypass is still a patchwork of new and old, good and poor quality road sections, and full of heavy goods vehicles. Therefore it is often faster to go through the Serbian capital.

By boat

Belgrade lies where the rivers Sava and the Danube meet. Passenger ships enable you to reach every place along the Danube in a very convenient and meditative manner with many fascinating attractions along it, but it is a quite slow and rather expensive way of travelling.

By bicycle

Belgrade is located on European bicycle route Eurovelo 6 which connects Atlantic Ocean and Black Sea.

Get around

A Belgrade trolleybus

By public transport

GSP Beograde (ГСП in Serbian Cyrillic) operates extensive public transport network of buses, trolleybuses, and trams in the city and suburbs. Maps are available online. There is a BusPlus android app for checking wait times for the next vehicle to arrive at any given stop.

There are 12 tram lines, hundreds of bus lines, 8 trolleybus lines, and 9 public minibus lines (E1–E9).

Fares

Bus Plus is the payment system for all modes of public transport except minibuses. There are two farecard options for non-residents, which can be bought at kiosks:

City transport is divided into two tariff zones (map). A ticket costs 89 RSD and is valid for 90 minutes. In this 90 min. you can use all public transport, but you need to validate/scan your ticket each time your enter a vehicle. If the ticket is purchased from the driver, it costs 150 RSD. Newsstands/kiosks sell tickets for 1 day (280 RSD), 3 days (720 RSD) or 5 days (1100 RSD). For full ticket information see the official ticket fares website. Children under the age of 7 ride free. The penalty for being caught without a paid ticket is RSD1500.

All tickets (except those bought from the driver) must be validated on machines inside the vehicle. Tickets are also valid for BG:Voz commuter rail, but not for BeoVoz and minibuses.

Minibus fares are RSD150, payable to the driver.

Daily transport starts at 04:00 and ends at 00:00. Night transportation is operated only by buses. It is sparse and goes every half-hour to every hour, but there are plans to make all night lines depart every half-hour. It is best to ask where and when to use it since some of the night lines are modified versions of the daily ones. Here is a map of night lines.

Tram Line 2 is famous in the city with a circular route, running in both directions. The circle is known as krug dvojke (#2's circle) and rings the central city streets. Line 3 is famous for a beautiful neighborhoods it goes through, particularly Miloš's Konak Park.

By commuter rail

State-owned BeoVoz commuter rail have six lines connecting Belgrade suburbs with the city:

However, it is very unreliable, and often late. Use it only if you must, and be patient. Very patient. The suburbs served by the commuter trains are not of general tourist interest.

There is also one line under control of City of Belgrade, called BG:Voz (BG:Train). These trains run according to schedule which is every 30 minutes (15 minutes on rush hour). Timetables for both Beovoz and Bg:Voz are available here .

By taxi

Taxis are cheap by European standards, though far more expensive than anywhere else in Serbia.

General precautions

Taxi scams are common in Belgrade. It is always best if you order taxi by phone since your order will be saved in the operator database. Here is the official info about taxi service in Belgrade. Taxi fares are regulated by the government and are as follows: RSD140 to start a ride, RSD55-110 per kilometer (depending on time of day) and RSD12.5 per minute waiting time.

Be sure to chose a taxi with a roof sign with the city coat of arms and a number, indicating it's a city-regulated radio taxi. Never take a privately owned cab - the ones with the white marker on the top that does not list the name of the company - since you can pay up to four times the normal price. Also, legal taxis must have their license plates ending with TX (for example: BG-1234-TX).

Insist that the trip be metered. The only exception is the case when you take taxi from the airport, where it is possible to buy vouchers with fixed prices. Tipping taxi drivers is welcomed but not required and your luggage transport is included in the metered price.

If you believe that the driver is trying to rip you off, call the operator of that taxi association to check if the price is regular for the specified distance. Afraid of the inspection, they might call back the driver and bring him to reason. Also, ask for a signed bill indicating date, time, start and end destination, price and drivers signature. Write down the number on the blue sign on the vehicle roof, as well as the license plates. Report the incident to city inspection (+381 11 3227-000) and if you are going from or to the airport, report it also to airport inspection (+381 11 2097-373, taxi@beg.aero). If the driver is aggressive towards you, call the police.

By car

As in most of Europe you must keep to the right side of the road. Driving in Belgrade can be stressful. Avoid rush hours (8:30–9:30AM, 4–6PM). Plan you journey if you are going in to the city core, and expect to have a hard time finding a free parking place on the streets during Friday and Saturday evenings in the center. Garages might be a better choice.

Keep your low beam headlights turned on, during both day and night. Speed limit on the streets of the city is 50 km/h, near schools even less, on the highway is higher. Police is known to wait at places where you might feel comfortable to drive over the limit, but almost never on the highway. Take special care while crossing Branko's bridge, and driving on following streets: Bulevar Mihaila Pupina, Jurija Gagarina, Vladimira Popovića, and other major ones. Keep your seat belts fastened. Other passengers must also do the same, even when sitting on the back seat (if there are seat belts installed).

Allowed level of blood alcohol content (BAC) is 0.03%, which is roughly equal to one drink. If you do go by car to drink, consider going back using taxi or Safe driver service, +381 64 174 6411. They will come to pick you up on the small, folding motorcycle, pack it in your trunk, and drive you back home in your car. Their charge is modest, and slightly higher than one-way ride with the taxi (1150RSD for <10 km, 1550RSD for >10 km etc).

Yellow lanes

Many boulevards and some streets have yellow lanes. They are reserved for public transport, i.e. buses and taxis, and you are not allowed to use them. The yellow lanes are marked with a yellow line, and are indicated on traffic signs. Some yellow lanes, though, are active only in certain periods of the day, usually during rush hours.

Parking

There are spaces for parking in the city center. There is a large parking garage with 500 spaces under the old palace in the city center, across from the parliament building.

Also, take into consideration that in the center almost all of the parking spaces in the central streets have zones marked with green, yellow or red paint on the street (yellow zone spaces are actually marked orange, to avoid confusion with other marks). You can only stay for 3, 2 or 1 hours, respectively, in those spots. You can pay using the machine usually found near the parking spots, buy the parking ticket at a kiosk or by cell phone (just text your car's license plate number (for example: BG123AA) to numbers 9111 (red zone), 9112 (yellow) or 9113 (green)). Every message you send is valid for one hour and, some 5 minutes before the hour has passed, you get a text message telling you that you can send another SMS if you want to extend your parking for the next hour. Of course, this only applies in yellow and green zones, in which you can park for more than 1 hour. After the time is up, you'll have to re-park or risk paying a fine (around €15). All of this only applies on weekdays, from 7AM to 9PM and from 7AM to 2PM on Saturdays. After that (Sa 2PM – Mo 7AM) parking is free.

There are also several public parking garages and parking lots where you can park for an unlimited amount of time during day. Fees are charged on an hourly basis (price varies, usually around €0.7-0.9/hour). In some non-zoned areas, you also pay for parking depending on the duration of your stay, and this is paid in cash to the parking attendant.

Detailed information can be found on the Parking Service website .

Parking violations are dealt with rather swiftly in the city center and with less commitment in the peripheral zones. Failure to pay for parking in a marked spot is handled by parking enforcement officers and can only result in a fine which would be difficult to collect if you're operating a foreign licensed vehicle. On the other hand, illegally parked vehicles are handled by the traffic police. Once spotted, the police are required to wait for 15 minutes for the driver to return. If you do return in time, you will be issued a sanction and a fine (around €50). When the 15 minutes are up, your car will get towed to one of 4 designated lots in the city. You may locate it using an online service http://www.parking-servis.co.rs/en/vehicle_towing/where_is_my_vehicle. Once at the lot, you will be required to present a valid form of ID and the vehicle matriculation papers, pay the mandatory fine and towing expenses (around €90 in total).

By bicycle

Old Belgrade is pretty hilly and the cycling infrastructure is scarce, so bicycle transport isn't in wide use. However, New Belgrade and Zemun are relatively flat and offer enough space for bikes to be used. Bicycle tracks link Zemun, Dorćol, Ada Ciganlija, New Belgrade and Bežanijska kosa. There is a bike lift on Brankov Bridge operating 365 days and the ride is free of charge. There is also more than 50 bicycle racks around the city.

Riding a bike on the same roads with cars and buses is considered too dangerous, although on smaller streets it can be reasonably safe. Avoid riding on major (multilane) roads. Unfortunately, you are not allowed to bring bikes into public transport vehicles.

Bicycle rentals are available mostly at recreational areas like Ada Ciganlija or Zemun quay. Average price is around €1.5/hour and €4/day.

By boat

Small boats connecting Ada Ciganlija to Novi Beograd's Block 70a are the only mode of public transport on rivers. Also, there are several tourist boats which offer day and night cruises along the Sava and Danube.

By night bus

Night public transport starts at midnight and lasts until 4AM and is operated by buses. There are numerous lines that will take you to any part of town . The tickets are bought inside the bus and, as of April 2014, they are 150 RSD for one zone and 210 RSD for both zones. The ticket seller will ask you where you are going, so that you buy a proper ticket.

Sometimes it can occur that you ride on a daytime line well after midnight. Take note that night lines have suffix "N" (e.g. 15N) and only in them you have to buy the night ticket. Daytime lines are daytime lines even after midnight.

See

Belgrade city core is not too big. Everything between Kalemegdan, Knez Mihajlova street and Skadarska street is best viewed by foot. Other than that, it is recommended to use other means of transportation. Note that many of Belgrade's museums are closed on Monday. It may be wise to check before making a visit.

Religious places

Museums and galleries

Do

Cinemas

Movies in Serbia are subtitled, not dubbed. Best movie theaters are:

If you prefer theaters in the city core, check also:

Festivals and events

Sports

Association football

Association football is the most popular spectator sport in Serbia. While Begrade isn't home to any of the traditional European football giants, the local derby between Partizan Belgrade and Red Star Belgrade (won both European and International Cup in 1991), also known as the Eternal Derby (Вечити дерби), is considered to be one of the most intensive sport events. Even if you do not support either club, but you enjoy cheering, watching one of the matches between the two sides is still recommended to experience the atmosphere. Due to the intensity of the rivalry, it is not recommended to wear either team's colors outside the stadium.

Basketball and tennis

Basketball and tennis are also popular. Kombank Arena and Pionir Hall are the main venues for basketball and other indoor sports, while tennis is played at the Novak Tennis Center (Serbia Open), as well as in Kombank Arena (Davis Cup matches).

Learn

Serbian courses for foreigners are organized in several places including:

The University of Belgrade admits foreign students, as do various private institutions of higher education.

Buy

For information on the Serbian currency, see Serbia#Buy. Menjačnica Mićko (Vuka Karadzica street #4), changes all currencies, including rare ones.

Most stores operate late hours during work days, while on Saturdays they normally close around 15.00 and most of them are not open on Sundays. However, shopping malls are open late every day, including weekends.

Clothes and Accessories

Import taxes make clothes and shoes in Serbia very expensive. Many items from common European chains can be found for 20% less in Budapest. Still, Belgrade has many flagship stores, mostly located on Knez Mihailova Street and the Terazije square, or the pedestrian zone, representing assorted high-fashion brands.

Almost all of the major European brands are present, including H&M, Guess, New Yorker, Zara, Bershka, Hugo Boss, Springfield, Stradivarius, Mango, Diesel, Liu Jo, C&A, and Pull & Bear. More expensive clothes & accessories (such as Diane Von Furstenberg, Lanvin, Marni, D&G, Valentino, Marc Jacobs, YSL, Mulberry and many others) can be usually found either at the Kralja Petra street (Dorćol) in Distante Fashion center, as well as in XYZ stores that are located in Ušće Shopping Center and Delta City.

Local department store chains include Artisti and Land.

Local Belgrade designers are present in the Choomich (Belgrade Design District) shopping center. The biggest bookstores in Belgrade selling beside Serbian also foreign (mostly English) books are located in the city center. Vulkan is at the beginning and Plato is at the end of Knez Mihailova street. The shopping malls also have large bookstores. There are also some shops that sell newspapers and magazines in English, German, French, Italian, Russian and other foreign languages.

International Newspapers and Magazines

Newsstands and bookstores in the city sell foreign newspapers and magazines. These include Delfi, Plato Press (near Studentski trg), Tell Me (next to the Plato store) and Inmedio (three locations - Delta City, Usce Center, Zira Center). Newspapers and magazines can be found in various international languages like English, Spanish, Italian, French, Russian, German and others.

Shopping malls

Belgrade has 3 shopping malls in the city - Delta City, Stadion and Ušće Shopping Center - and more than 30 shopping centers like Merkator, Immo Centar, Millenium, Piramida, City Hall, Zira and others.

Hypermarkets

Eat

For information on Serbian cuisine, see Serbia#Eat

Belgrade has hundreds of restaurants specializing in local cuisine and a number of international restaurants. On the whole, prices are cheap compared to Western Europe with main dishes ranging from €5–20 per person.

Stepin Vajat(Степин Вајат) and Duff at Autokomanda, Mara in downtown area and Iva in Žarkovo are the best grill fast food restaurants in town.

For good-tasting Sarajevo pies try Fofa (Cyrillic: Фофа) at Kralja Petra 75. Nice gesture is that Fofa does not charge to pregnant women.

Farmer's market

Depending on the season, an amazing assortment of fruit and vegetables can be found in farmer's markets, including watermelons, olives, wild mushrooms, and fresh figs. Take the time to explore the stalls, and compare the quality and prices of the produce. Most produce at the farmer's markets in Belgrade are organic and fresh from the farmer's gardens brought over daily from the villages surrounding the city. You will notice the particularly good taste of this produce.

International cuisine

There are a handful of international restaurants, including Italian, Chinese and Japanese. These are moderately priced to very expensive. Many dine out at:

Chinese

Japanese

Mexican

Italian

Serbian cuisine

For those interested in what would be a typical Serbian meal, check out these places :

Some restaurants are famous not only by the quality, but also the quantity of the meals:

Fish

If you prefer a delicious fish meal try fish gourmet restaurants by the Sava and Danube:

Vegetarian

In regular restaurants and homes it is sometimes assumed that a "vegetarian" eats fish. If you don't, you should specify (bez mesa, bez ribe - without meat, without fish).

Drink

Despite the warnings of the US.CDC , tap water in Belgrade is perfectly safe. There is a wide range of bottled waters on offer in grocery stores, supermarkets, and kiosks. The water in the city center tends to have a white appearance when first poured from the tap. This is from air bubbles and disappears within a few minutes.

Serbs love beer, and it is possible to buy a variety of domestic beers such as Jelen, Lav, MB, Pils. Along with a few imported beers, at very cheap prices. The domestic beers are quite decent. Foreign beers made under license in Serbia include Heineken, Amstel, Tuborg, Stella Artois, and Beck's. Belgrade holds a Beer Festival annually in August.

Culture Tip: How to toast, Serbian style

Like everywhere, Serbs love to toast when in good company, whether it's in a pub or in the home with friends. When toasting in Serbia, it is expected that you look your friends at the table directly in the eyes whilst clinking glasses as a sign of respect. Say 'Živeli!' (cheers!) to everyone and take a sip. Repeat as necessary, and enjoy a night out in Belgrade!

Local wines can be good, although more expensive tends to mean more drinkable, and many of the less expensive bottles are less than satisfactory. Wines from neighbouring Macedonia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Croatia are also good and can be found in Belgrade. The national alcoholic drink is rakija, a Serbian brandy (especially plum brandy - šljivovica, also slivovitsa in English) that is very strong and makes a good souvenir.

For the sober crowd, Belgrade has blueberry, raspberry, tomato, peach, apple, strawberry, and any other kind of juice you can think of.

All cafés serve the usual continental coffees, such as espresso and cappuccino. However, regular coffee comes in the form of Turkish coffee, not filtered coffee. If you want a filtered coffee, you need to specify this when ordering, and not all coffee shops have it. Also very popular is whipped instant coffee, commonly referred to simply as 'Nes' (as in, Nescafé). A cafe called Mali Prag (across from the Hotel Prag) is thought by some to offer the best "Serb Coffee" in the world.

There are a couple of places worth visiting if you are a fan of cafe culture. The street best known for its trendy cafes is definitely Strahinjića Bana. On this street, cafes are full even on weekdays. The best atmosphere is on Friday evenings when the trendy youth of Belgrade descend to enjoy the music and each other. Out of numerous cafes, the best ones are:

The second cafe zone is Obilićev Venac (a street parallel to Knez Mihailova). The best cafes there are:

Third cafe zone (also a going out zone) is quay next to hotel Yugoslavia in Zemun. On the quay are numerous river boats (splavovi), many of them are cafes, restaurants and clubs.

Other places worth visiting:

Sleep

There are plenty of places to stay in Belgrade - just walk around and you will find something.

Hostels

Budget hotels

Mid-range

Splurge

Stay safe

Overall, Belgrade is a pretty safe city, but like anywhere, you should always keep money, mobile phones, travel documents and other valuable personal items in secure places. Pickpocketers are known to operate in public transportation, and other crowded places so never wear a backpack or purse on your back and make sure that you have your wallet in one of your front pockets. If you own a car, it is preferable to have a security system. Traffic laws are usually observed although nervous drivers can change lanes suddenly or make dangerous turns when avoiding traffic during rush hour. So be cautious if you are a pedestrian or riding a bike. The taxi drivers are notorious for swerving in and out of lanes. Pay close attention to the traffic signals as a pedestrian.

Also try to avoid getting into conflicts. If you are staying out late in a bar or a club, there is always a small chance that someone will try to pick a fight especially if you are in a group and a single guy is showing hostility. That is a trap by local thugs looking for a brawl. That is not because you are a foreigner: it is just the "law of the streets", so anyone can be the target. Just ignore them and walk away no matter what they say or do. The chances that this will happen are very low, but stay alert. Do not try to make fun of the locals in your native language. Almost everyone has at least a basic understanding of English and is familiar with foul words and curses.

In Serbia, including Belgrade, violence against gays and lesbians can occur. Gay and lesbian travelers should be discreet. As a rule, public displays of affection between two people of the same sex are likely to be met with disapproval and sometimes verbal abuse and/or physical violence. There are several gay bars and clubs all around the city and they tend to get quite full. Be cautious when arriving at or leaving such clubs. Often there are security personnel guarding the immediate entrance. There are quite a few LGBT parties organized periodically by various organizations and at different locations, such as Loud and Queer events. Avoid football fan crowds at all costs if you think you may be a target because of your appearance which they tend to be extremely violent and homophobic. There are several LGBT organisations at your disposal in Belgrade.

Emergencies

In case of an emergency, call 192 (police), 193 (fire) or 194 (ambulance). Always carry the phone number and an address of your embassy with you. In case of injury or illness, the place to go is the Urgentni centar (Emergency center), Pasterova 2 of the Clinical Center of Serbia. Be aware that not all medical facilities have personnel that speak English or other foreign languages. Consult the embassy of your country if possible.

Pharmacies on duty 24/7:

Connect

The international telephone code for Serbia is 381. Most cities in Serbia and mobile operators have 2-digit area code. There is only one area code for Belgrade and that is 11. Typical land-line phone number in Belgrade +381-11/xxx-xxxx. Typical mobile phone number is +381-6x/xxx-xxxx. From Serbian land line phone, use 00 prefix for international calls (e.g. 0031-20/xxx-xxxx for Amsterdam, Netherlands), and prefix 0 for calls inside Serbia but outside your area (e.g. 021/xxx-xxxx for Novi Sad, Serbia or 06x/xxx-xxxx for Serbian mobile). If you dial inside the same area, there is no need to use the prefix (just dial xxx-xxxx). From a mobile phone, you always have to dial the area code (011/xxx-xxxx for Belgrade land line phone, 0xx/xxx-xxx(x) for other Serbian land line phones or 06x/xxx-xxxx for Serbian mobile).

Basically all of Serbia is covered with mobile networks of all three operators. It is easy to buy and charge cheap pre-paid numbers at the kiosks around the city. If you use 064, 065 or 066 (MTS), pre-paid number, use *100# to check the credit, for 063, 062 and 069 (Telenor), use *121#, for 061 and 060 (Vip), use *123#.

There is a number of red-colored payphones across the city, operated by telephone cards available at the kiosks.

Free wireless access is available at Student park in Belgrade center and in many restaurants, bars and hotels. Mobile operators offers pre- and post-paid wireless Internet packages.

Stay healthy

Belgrade's climate is generally temperate, so tourist visits are possible at any time of year. However, July and August can be uncomfortably hot, with temperatures reaching 40 °C (104 °F) on several days. Minimize your exposure to the sun on such days to avoid heat exhaustion. On the other hand, January and February are sometimes very cold. When it snows in winter, the streets are covered in sleet the next day, so be careful when walking. The Košava, a notorious Belgrade wind, may give you a cold more quickly than you would expect - take care and dress appropriately.

For runners, a sunrise or sunset run through Kalemegdan is a must-do. Running along the Ada lake in the mornings or evenings is a great experience too. Try to avoid running during the day, as it usually is both hot and very crowded.

Also be mindful of the high number of stray animals roaming streets, particularly dogs. Whilst it is very rare that they demonstrate outward signs of illness or aggression, err on the side of caution and avoid coming in physical contact. These are nevertheless rarely seen in the city center.

Pharmacies – called 'apoteka' – are found throughout the city center. Look for lit green crosses on building façades. Some, such as the one in Kralja Milana Str, are open twenty-four hours. These will carry a range of prescription medicines, as well as over-the-counter products like pain killers and vitamin supplements. Serbian pharmacies were known during the 1990s and early 2000s for selling without a prescription many medications which are prescription-only in Western Europe. This practice has faded significantly, but it hasn't disappeared entirely. However, the convenience stores referred to by Belgraders as 'dragstor' do not sell any medicines at all.

Cope

There are a few dozens of gyms around the city, every neighborhood has at least a few. Prices range (so as quality) €20–80 per month, or a bit less for 12/16 visits.

In case you need to fix your umbrella you may do that in the last remaining umbrella service in town in Visnjiceva 4.

It is difficult to avoid tobacco smoke in restaurants, bars and clubs. However, other enclosed public places, including the malls, are smoke-free. Some hotels allow smoking in parts of the building.

Embassies and other diplomatic missions

Go next

Archaeological Sites

This article is issued from Wikivoyage - version of the Friday, March 25, 2016. The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share Alike but additional terms may apply for the media files.