Agrigento

Agrigento is a medium-sized city on the south coast of Sicily, Italy, famous for its world heritage listed Greek Valley of Temples.

Get in

By train

Frequent trains run from the station near the centre of town to Palermo and Caltanissetta, less frequently to Enna (but not that useful - the station in Enna is about 5km below the town). The journey to/from Palermo takes 2 hours and costs €7.45. Connecting with the east of Sicily by train is not easy, and takes a long time. The train station is at Piazza Marconi, on the southeast corner of the old town.

By bus

Frequent buses run to Palermo (Down the street from Stazione Centrale), Caltanissetta, Catania, Sciacca and close(ish) to Eraclea Minoa. A few also run to Gela and Trapani via Mazara del Vallo, Marsala and Castelvetrano (for Selinunte).

By boat

There are daily boats and hydrofoils in summer (fewer boats and no hydrofoils in winter) from Agrigento's port 3km away - Porto Empedocle to the islands of Lampedusa and Linosa. See SIREMAR and Ustica Lines . There are frequent local buses from Porto Empedocle into Agrigento.

Get around

On foot

The town centre and its medieval streets can easily be reached on foot from the train station.

By bus

Frequent city buses run from outside the train station, stopping at the Archeological Museum and slightly further downhill, the main entrance of the Valle dei Templi. Buses 1, 2 and 3 all head down to the temples but you must buy your ticket before boarding from the bar inside the station (€1.10 for the 5-10 minute ride) and validate it once on board the bus. You could also walk, but it can get very hot in summer.

See

The Valley of Temples

Temple of Herakles (Ercole), Agrigento

Stretching along a ridge to the south of the city are a string of five Greek temples, a sight worthy of comparison to the Acropolis itself in Athens. The temples are usually divided into two zones: the Eastern Zone and Western Zone each side of the main entrance and the road from the city centre. It can get punishingly hot in summer and there is little shade other than some olive trees along the ridge itself. Entrance costs around €10 plus extra for an audio tour, visiting the gardens, or a simple map.

Temple of Concord, Agrigento

To put all these sights in context, it is well worth visiting the Archeological Museum (half way back into the city centre) and the adjacent Roman Quarter (with a few nice mosaics). Daily guided tours of the Valley of the Temples can be hired from VisitAgrigento though an audio tour is available at the entrance to the temples. (Some ID is required as security for these, which means walking back the entire length of the site just to give the guide back).

Archaeological Museum and classical period living quarters

The Museum is about half way from the station to the Valley of the Temples and contains numerous artifacts taken from the site. It is purposely built to accommodate a huge telamon, reconstructed from pieces.

The residential quarters are on the other side of the road.

Old Agrigento

The old centre of Agrigento is also worth a visit.

Do

A visit at the time of the Festa del Mandorlo in Fiore (almond Blossom Festival) towards the end of February is to be commended.

Eat

Sample the Greek-influenced cuisine, especially eggplant (aubergine) and olive oil-based dishes.

Sleep

Budget

Mid-range

Splurge

Go next

This article is issued from Wikivoyage - version of the Monday, March 21, 2016. The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share Alike but additional terms may apply for the media files.