How to Make an Ice Gel Pack

Two Methods:Making the Ice Gel PackUsing the Ice Gel Pack

From time to time, you're bound to experience sore muscles or perhaps a bump or sprained ankle. It's a good idea an ice pack in their freezer for such times. Icy gels are available at every pharmacy and most grocery stores, but if you would like to make your own, it's fairly simple and quick.

Method 1
Making the Ice Gel Pack

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    Add the ingredients. Place 1 cup water and 1/2 cup rubbing alcohol into a medium-sized sealable freezer bag.
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    Seal the bag. Ensure there are no leaks in it.
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    Place the bag in the freezer. Let it freeze for at least 3 hours before trying to use it. Note: Since the alcohol keeps the water fluid, the mixture will not actually freeze but it will become nice and cold.

Method 2
Using the Ice Gel Pack

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    Apply to swollen or sore areas, bumps and scrapes when needed.
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    After each use, place the ice gel pack back into the freezer for future use. It should last at least a few uses.

Tips

  • When you fill the bag, make sure that it isn't overfilled or it risks bursting when squeezed.
  • Double bag the solution to help prevent leaks. This should last for a long time.
  • Add a few drops of blue food color before freezing to make your pack look authentic. It's also a good idea to label it, to prevent accidental ingestion.

Warnings

  • Do not try to heat this pack. It is meant for icy relief only, it would be giving off fumes if heated.
  • This pack should not be applied directly to the skin as the temperature is so low that the pack could harm your skin. Please use cloth or tissue between skin and pack.

Things You'll Need

  • Water
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Watertight freezer bag, medium size

Article Info

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