How to Grow Your Own Easter Grass

Two Methods:Easter grass in eggshellsEaster grass in containers

You can purchase Easter grass from many stores at Easter time and you can make it from a range of items including paper and cellophane. For a more eco-friendly, simple and fun project though, growing your own Easter grass can be a great way to get ready for Easter. This is a really good activity to do with the kids––have them select the container, fill it, plant the seeds and wait like crazy to see the end results.

Method 1
Easter grass in eggshells

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    Assemble the supplies needed. You'll find these listed below under "Things You'll Need".
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    Choose which method to obtain the eggshell. Removing the raw egg from the eggshell is probably easier than removing a whole boiled egg. The important thing is to have most of the eggshell intact, about three quarters of it as there needs to be plenty of soil for good growth.
    • Rinse out the eggshells and allow to dry before proceeding.
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    Prepare the soil or potting soil. Pour some into a large mixing bowl or bucket. Add water to make the soil wet.
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    Position each eggshell in the egg carton. This will keep them snugly in place as you work with them.
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    Add the wet soil to each eggshell, to about three quarters of the way up. It helps to use a teaspoon to transfer the soil from the bowl to the eggshell.
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    Place the wheat or grass seeds across the surface of this soil, so that you can't see the soil underneath. It's important to pack them in because you want a very tight bunch of grass growing up, so that it mimics grass growth outdoors.
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    Finish off with another layer of wet soil but only enough to just cover the seeds.
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    Start growing. Position the egg carton with its precious contents in a warm and sunny spot, such as the windowsill. Water as needed using a spray bottle.
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    Depending on when you're using them and when you started growing them, the grass might need to be trimmed now and then.
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    Place on display for Easter. The eggs can be removed from the carton and placed into egg cups or other holders for display alongside other Easter decorations. Or, if you'd like, simply leave the egg carton filled with Easter grass and turn the whole carton into an Easter grass decoration.
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    Plant in the garden or a large container after use. You can continue growing the grass if wished; simply place the entire eggshell and its contents into the new home. The eggshell will disintegrate and its nutrients will nourish the surrounding soil.

Method 2
Easter grass in containers

A container will be far more durable than eggshells and the resulting Easter grass can be placed into Easter baskets as well as in displays provided the container you're using is sturdy and can sit well in the basket.

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    Assemble the supplies needed. You'll find these listed below under "Things You'll Need". In selecting a container, choose one that will look pretty or relevant to your Easter display. You might use a hollow rabbit shaped container, or a plain container that can be decorated in Easter patterns and colors. Or, choose one such as a plastic berry container that can be placed easily into the base of an Easter basket rather than going on display.
    • If you want to be able to grow the grass direct in an Easter basket, line the basket with something waterproof such as plastic wrap, a plastic bag or cellophane. This will prevent the water from leaching into the basket and the soil from going everywhere.
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    Pour the potting soil or soil into a large bowl or bucket. Pour in enough water to wet and mix through.
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    Fill the container three quarters of the way full with the wet soil.
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    Place a layer of wheat or grass seeds across the container, packed in tightly so that you can't see the soil underneath. You will probably need a lot more than you'd need for an eggshell container, depending on the size of the container chosen. Again, the reason for packing in the seeds is to ensure luxuriant growth.
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    Cover lightly with some more soil and pat into place.
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    Place in a warm, sunny position, such as the windowsill. Keep an eye on the need for additional water; use a spray bottle. The sprouts should shoot up within a few days, sometimes even in a day.
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    Keep trimmed as needed. The wheat or grass will grown to a good length within 4 to 5 days.
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    Use in displays or Easter baskets. If using in an Easter basket, it's a good idea to place something like wax paper or a waterproof sheet like the ones found in some Styrofoam meat trays, to protect the base of the basket from any wetness seeping out.

Tips

  • Don't despair if you've left this till the last minute; if you plant some on Good Friday, there should be some Easter grass ready for Easter Sunday; it won't be as lush as 5-7 day's growth but it'll still give enough of the impression. You can create a more humid environment by placing a damp paper towel over the top of the container.
  • Vermiculite can be used in place of potting soil. It is lighter than soil, holds moisture well and is available at some garden centers.
  • Avoid planting the seeds too deeply or they'll take a lot longer to push through to the surface.
  • Wheat seeds (wheat berries or wheat kernels) can be found in many health food stores. Ask your local nursery or a stock feed center about both wheat and other types of grass seeds.
  • Use the egg contents for cooking with or adding to a salad/sandwich if already boiled.

Things You'll Need

Eggshells:

  • Eggs (raw or boiled, as preferred)
  • The egg carton they came in
  • Wheat or grass seeds
  • Soil or potting soil
  • Water

Container:

  • Wheat or grass seeds (lots)
  • Soil or potting soil
  • Water
  • Container


Article Info

Categories: Easter Crafts